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WHAT WE OFFER

At Across The Life Span, PLLC, we are focused on providing Mental Health and Primary Care services with the highest levels of customer satisfaction-we will do everything we can to meet your expectations. With a variety of offerings to choose from, we’re sure you’ll be happy working with us.

MENTAL HEALTH

  • ANXIETY
  • DEPRESSION
  • BIPOLAR
  • GRIEF
  • PTSD
  • DEMENTIA

PRIMARY CARE

  • DIABETES
  • HYPERTENSION
  • HYPERLIPIDEMIA
  • OBESITY
  • ASTHMA
  • WOMEN’S HEALTH

SUBSTANCE ABUSE

  • OFFICE BASED OPIOID TREATMENT/MAT

ANXIETY

Anxiety is a normal part of life. You might feel anxious when faced with a problem at work, before taking a test, or making an important decision. But anxiety disorders involve more than temporary worry or fear. For a person with an anxiety disorder, the anxiety does not go away and can get worse over time. The feelings can interfere with daily activities such as job performance, school work, and relationships. There are several different types of anxiety disorders. Examples include generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, and social anxiety disorder.

DEPRESSION

The normal ups and downs of life mean that everyone feels sad or has “the blues” from time to time. But if emptiness and despair have taken hold of your life and won’t go away, you may have depression. Depression makes it tough to function and enjoy life like you once did. Just getting through the day can be overwhelming. But no matter how hopeless you feel, you can get better. Understanding the signs, symptoms, causes, and treatment of depression is the first step to overcoming the problem. Sadness or downswings in mood are normal reactions to life’s struggles, setbacks, and disappointments. Many people use the word “depression” to explain these kinds of feelings, but depression is much more than just sadness.

PTSD

When in danger, it’s natural to feel afraid. This fear triggers many split-second changes in the body to prepare to defend against the danger or to avoid it. This “fight-or-flight” response is a healthy reaction meant to protect a person from harm. But in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), this reaction is changed or damaged. People who have PTSD may feel stressed or frightened even when they’re no longer in danger.

PTSD develops after a terrifying ordeal that involved physical harm or the threat of physical harm. The person who develops PTSD may have been the one who was harmed, the harm may have happened to a loved one, or the person may have witnessed a harmful event that happened to loved ones or strangers.

DIABETES

Diabetes, often referred to by doctors as diabetes mellitus, describes a group of metabolic diseases in which the person has high blood glucose (blood sugar), either because insulin production is inadequate, or because the body’s cells do not respond properly to insulin, or both. Patients with high blood sugar will typically experience polyuria (frequent urination), they will become increasingly thirsty (polydipsia) and hungry (polyphagia).

HYPERTENSION

Hypertension (HTN or HT), also known as high blood pressure, is a long-term medical condition in which the blood pressure in the arteries is persistently elevated. High blood pressure usually does not cause symptoms. Long-term high blood pressure; however, is a major risk factor for coronary artery disease, stroke, heart failure, peripheral vascular disease, vision loss, and chronic kidney disease.Blood pressure is expressed by two measurements, the systolic and diastolic pressures, which are the maximum and minimum pressures, respectively. Normal blood pressure at rest is within the range of 100–140 millimeters mercury (mmHg) systolic and 60–90 mmHg diastolic. High blood pressure is present if the resting blood pressure is persistently at or above 140/90 mmHg for most adults. Different numbers apply to children. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring over a 24 hour period appears more accurate than office best blood pressure measurement.

OBESITY

At their most basic, the words “overweight” and “obesity” are ways to describe having too much body fat. The most commonly used measure of weight status today is the body mass index, or BMI.

BMI uses a simple calculation based on the ratio of someone’s height and weight (BMI = kg/m2). Decades of research have shown that BMI provides a good estimate of “fatness” and also correlates well with important health outcomes like heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and overall mortality.

What’s considered a healthy BMI?

  • For adult men and women, a BMI between 18.5 and 24.9 is considered healthy.
  • Overweight is defined as a BMI between 25.0 and 29.9, and a BMI of 30 or higher is considered obese.

ASTHMA

Asthma (AZ-ma) is a chronic (long-term) lung disease that inflames and narrows the airways. Asthma causes recurring periods of wheezing (a whistling sound when you breathe), chest tightness, shortness of breath, and coughing. The coughing often occurs at night or early in the morning.

Asthma affects people of all ages, but it most often starts during childhood. In the United States, more than 25 million people are known to have asthma. About 7 million of these people are children.

GERIATRICS NURSING

Geriatric Nurses help elderly patients. These older adults are at greater risk of injuries and diseases like osteoporosis, Alzheimer’s and cancer, which is why Geriatric Nurses focus on preventative care. They also help patients, and their families, cope with certain medical conditions that develop later in life. As a Geriatric Nurse, you can work in nursing homes, with home healthcare services and in hospice facilities taking care of bedridden patients, those with impaired mental ability, and for patients who are in pain.

Geriatric nurses are educated to understand and treat the often complex physical and mental health needs of older people. They try to help their patients protect their health and cope with changes in their mental and physical abilities, so older people can stay independent and active as long as possible.